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5 Quick Fixes for Common Marketing Mishaps

When one of your initiatives doesn’t go as planned, the worst thing you can do is kick sand over it.

Instead, you need to find the underlying dynamic. By illuminating shortcomings, you can request budget to correct them. Consider the following problems that tend to plague even the most savvy marketers.

Your lead quality needs to increase

Forget about your conversions for a second, and look at those other people you got in the door. What’s your plan for them? Obviously, you don’t want to inflict their unqualified selves on sales, so it’s time to develop good nurturing programs.

Yes, they take some thought, and they’ll need to be reevaluated and adjusted as time goes on. But they’re worth it because they gradually warm up cooler leads, turning them into qualified prospects.

Your lead scoring is inaccurate

A lot of so-called common wisdom about lead behavior has been disproven. So if you’re still assuming that webinar attendance signals a future buyer, you may want to revamp your scoring process.

Ask sales about the prospects they work with. What traits and behaviors are more likely to lead to a sale? What sources seems to supply the most interested leads? The idea is to find patterns in successful conversions.

You’re not doing the math

I know that I’m guilty of this one. Maybe numbers aren’t really your thing either, but there comes a time when you have to buckle down and figure out the facts. How are your efforts being attributed? Which campaigns had the most interest and conversion to revenue?

These are the results that will help you determine how many MQLs you need to convert at a higher percentage.

Your buyer personas are outdated

It’s time to be brutally honest: If your buyer personas are a function of role or job title you are living in the dark ages. Are you designing your sales and marketing strategies with the buyers psychology in mind? It’s also important to keep personas fresh; don’t make the mistake of assuming today’s buyers are your 2013 buyers.

You may be selling to a new demographic these days—buyers further along the maturity curve or answering an unexpected need. Dig into your buyers and prospects at least twice per year, and make sure you understand exactly who you should be targeting.

Your content is meaningless

A clever tagline and pretty design don’t go as far as they used to. Your leads and customers are experts by now at ignoring marketing messages.

What does get and hold attention? Relevance. The more your campaigns resonate on an individual level, the higher your conversion rate will go.

Have I convinced you yet to get honest about your shortcomings? I hope so. Remember, you can’t fix what isn’t working until you admit it—and request the budget to get the right improvements in place.

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