Episode 5

Deborah Sweeney | Leader at My Corporation

How to Align Teams During Times of Transition: Interview with Deborah Sweeney

Deborah Sweeney is the Leader of MyCorporation.com, an online business filing company helping 1 million+ small business owners and entrepreneurs since its founding in 1998. In this interview, she shares how she spun My Corporation out of Intuit during the Great Recession and how she’s navigating her team through COVID-19.

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3 Key Points:

  1. Conflicts of interest don’t have to be deal breakers – you just have to be transparent and honest about them. Tune in at 6:41 to hear how Deborah handled this.
  2. Remember hard lessons learned will come in handy in the future. Deborah spun out My Corporation from Intuit at the height of the Great Recession, but what she learned navigating her team through that crisis gave her an edge when COVID-19 hit.
  3. Sometimes your role will change, but your passion and purpose can remain the same. Skip over to 21:38 to hear why Deborah was hesitant to sell her company, and how she struck a deal to continue working with her team and leading My Corporation forward.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

1:24 – How do you convince a Goliath (like Intuit) to let you take a division and spin it into a new company?

3:19 – How can you recognize Catalyst moments?

6:41 – Working through conflicts of interest. Here’s how Deborah approached it when pitching Inuit on acquiring My Corporation.

9:05 – How can you identify areas of opportunity in your business?

12:53 – How do you connect with customers during a crisis?

15:07 – How can you foster a strong team mentality, and create alignment, while staying agile and keeping lines of communication open?

17:41 – In the midst of COVID-19, learn how Deborah use lessons she learned leading My Corporation during the 2008 financial crisis.

21:38 – How do you know when it’s right to sell a company?

24:17 – Transitions can be tricky, but Deborah explains how she’s transitioned seamlessly from owning My Corporation to leading it with Deluxe Corporation.

28:15 – Looking ahead at the remainder of 2020, Deborah shares what she’s most excited about for My Corporation.

31:35 – Wrap-Up: Find Deborah on Twitter: @deborahsweeney

Full Transcript

Justin:

Hey, hello and welcome again. You are back on Catalyst. We’re still in the COVID edition of Catalyst which is relevant for this topic. So I’ve got another great guest with me here today. This one brings a bit of perspective from not only obviously what we’re all operating with right now, but the last time we had a major world event that of course impacts business in a pretty substantial manner. So today I am happy to welcome Deborah Sweeney. Deborah, welcome to the show.

 

Deborah: 

Thanks for having me. Pleasure.

 

Justin:

Absolutely. And so Deborah, she’s got multiple things going on here, so we’ll deal with one of those first. She is the owner currently of MyCorporation, and then also the GM over at Small Business Services, which is actually … well, you can correct me in terms of the relationship there on how you guys relate to Deluxe about it. But I think most people have probably heard of that organization before. So again, let’s take those in a compartmental manner and tell me a little bit about MyCorporation and then a bit about Small Business Services.

 

Deborah:

You got it. So interestingly, I bought MyCorporation out of a publicly traded company called Intuit, which many people know as holding QuickBooks and Quicken, TurboTax and related products — and that happened 10 years ago. And so, it was like you mentioned another time of crisis in 1999, and the story is interesting, but I saw Intuit divesting smaller divisions. And I said, if you’re ever interested in divesting MyCorporation, it was a business that I ran before it was acquired by Intuit and then five years under Intuit as a general manager. So, I was able to get the company out of Intuit and then I ran and grew it for 10 years. About a year ago I sold it to Deluxe. 

 

So now, I’m not the owner of MyCorp, I’m just the leader, and then under Deluxe in the Small Business Services, I run a number of different divisions supporting small business. So that would include our incorporation service offering, business licenses, all types of business and legal filings, and then we also do logos and websites, and we do hosting and other related services under the Deluxe umbrella. So I’m fortunate to have gone from starting as a lawyer to being general counsel, selling the company, becoming an entrepreneur, and then now working in corporate. And I must say, corporate may be my biggest challenge, but also one of my best learning experiences. 

 

Justin:

You guys are really doing everything that a small organization could probably need that they often don’t specialize in. So, I want to get into that and also your comments certainly around the corporate side of things, because that certainly sounds interesting. But before we get into that, the show’s called Catalyst and that can mean a lot of things to a lot of different people. So I’m curious what that term means to you, and how you see that relating to some of these milestones that we’ll get into.

 

Deborah:

For me, a catalyst is about getting things going, and getting things moving and the impetus behind the action. So, I believe that catalyst is what drives you. It’s what gets you moving in the direction. I have teenage boys and I talk to them a lot about catalysts towards success in their lives. So I think what generates that movement and action towards something that makes a difference.

 

Justin:

So let’s talk about what I’m sure was a catalytic decision and certainly a catalyst moment. I also started a business in ’09, so right on the tail end of the early financial crisis. And I still always get the question…

 

Deborah:

Why?

 

Justin:

Why, yeah, exactly. Why do you think that was feasible during that timing? So it was really the same question to you. That’s a big transaction, there’s a bunch of nuances to that in terms of business value and performance and how things are going to come out of a situation like that. So I’m curious as to your thought pattern and just what made you think that was the right time?

 

Deborah:

Yeah, I have this bizarre self-confidence that I just think, “Oh well, if it’s not working in corporate, I could probably make it work better outside of corporate.” And obviously there’s some actionable facts behind it, right? Some of the business structure that we had in the larger corporate environment made margins and profitability cost prohibitive, and so spinning it out, I was able to right size a lot of the business and some of the expenditure to recognize that maybe it wasn’t just growth that was a priority, but margins and opportunity and strategy. And so, I think the catalytic moment was really me not thinking in some ways, I can do this, and having a good understanding of the legal part of the business, but also the backing of that corporate setting at Intuit which was a super fantastic learning experience as well.

 

And so I feel like I had garnered enough momentum around the small business mindset to be able to try to do it on my own. And again, I believed, first of all, it’s funny, I talk about my teenage boys, but at the time they were tiny babies, and it was really tough. I had left my law firm as a partner to go in house with this mindset that I needed something a little bit less time consuming, because I wanted to spend time with my kids. And so in my mind, being an entrepreneur gave me that flexibility. And obviously you work harder as an entrepreneur, but I think you also feel like you’re working on your own schedule on your own time.

 

And I think there was a component of that for me that was very valuable and in corporate, everyone knows. So your time is not your own, you’re on calendars all the time and people plug meetings and do all of this. So it’s just a different framework, and then when I was owning it, I just really set my boundaries, but I still probably worked more than I’ve ever worked in my life.

 

Justin:

I was going to say that seems to be a bit of a misnomer, but as you mentioned, you still do feel like you’re more in control and certainly that you’re more invested in your own success.

 

Deborah:

Yeah.

 

Justin:

So there’s an interesting nuance there, and I think it  gets back to what you mentioned, which is a trait bet that I think most if not all founders share, which is that aspect of self confidence and just the notion that something will work, even if it’s not the original plan. But you were actually working for Intuit at the time. Correct?

 

Deborah:

Right. Yes.

 

Justin: So, how does that actually take place? I’m sure there are conflicts that you have to work through there but that seems like a pretty big aspiration.

 

Deborah:

It was interesting because I was running the division. I presented it to the leadership at the time and the CEO of Intuit and said, “If you’re ever interested and I would be a good landing place for the organization.” So, I was aware of the potential perception of conflict, so I had to put together a whole presentation saying, there could be buyer A and buyer B and buyer C, and here’s why I might be one of the better outcomes. And I think one of the things I learned in corporate and depending on the corporate environment, but in Intuit there was a hyper focus on shareholders, customers and employees.

 

And I knew that one of their biggest was employees. And so I explained, and I would take all the employees that were at MyCorporation at the time and take them with me, and give them the same 401(k) Plan they had at Intuit and the same health benefits, and I would also of course take the customers. And I would assume a lot of the responsibility because frankly, I ran the division at Intuit. I knew the story there, and I thought I’m the best equipped to have all of the constituents land in a healthy place. And I think that’s what got it.

 

And I think the other thing I always talk about when I think about why me, why I got the business and why this worked out so nicely, as I think I was a good person, I tried really hard to be good to my team, to be good to the team at Intuit. And I think that they felt empathy toward me. Like, wow, you’re willing to take this out and you’re willing to try your best. And I had to get all sorts of crazy insurance and liability, protect all sorts of stuff, because they were worried like, what if she doesn’t succeed? And she’s naive and a little bit crazy. So, I definitely had to protect them in many ways as a division, but I also was saying, I’m willing to assume responsibility for this. And I think that gave me a lot of credibility.

 

Justin:

So let’s talk a little bit about the business performance. You mentioned that there were some opportunities there and maybe those were larger opportunities than even folks that had originally thought. What did you find once you dug in and how’d you precipitate that change?

 

Deborah:

Yeah. So there were two major things and almost all of it I can admit was in Intuit, like when you’re an entrepreneur, you just try and so I would constantly be thinking about all of the things, but there were two deliberate decisions that were made that were ended up being really successful for me or for our company. The first was annuity services. So, in the incorporation industry, many people just do the basic incorporation filing in the States. That’s what we do, but there’s also ongoing maintenance requirements for each of these businesses.

 

And so we put together a plan to develop annual report filings and registered agents, which is like a requirement for legal filings that you have a registered agent designated. And so when we thought about … Okay, we had these on … like call us if they want to renew and check in and see. And we asked, “Are you interested in this as maintaining your compliance or not?” And almost everybody said, “Oh my gosh, for $900 a year, I’ll happily pay you to do all my annual filings.”

 

And so it was a win for both our business, because then we had this ongoing annuity revenue and for the customers who never canceled because we’re in business, it was like, thank God you’re doing my filing for me. And our renewal rate to this day is over 78%. So it’s a pretty strong renewal rate for all the new businesses that start with us. And it was a hypothesis that, okay, are people going to be interested in the service and they’re going to want us to renew every year? And they were. And that was a big win. And the second was, under Intuit we had spent a lot of money on mass marketing. 

 

So, very similar to one of our competitors called LegalZoom, where it’s very broad based marketing that was not profitable, but it was brand building. I knew that as an individual, I could not afford that. Right. I can’t afford the paid search competition, the radio ads, the television ads, it just wasn’t viable. So where I decided to focus was on large partnerships. And so having Intuit as a partner, because when we spun out, they kept us as a partner. And then ultimately finding some really big partnerships with law firms and CPA firms with financial advisors, franchise orders ultimately payroll providers, funny enough Deluxe who ultimately bought us.

 

And my focus was to identify areas of opportunity where they needed our service, the partner itself to provide their service. So a good example would be a bank. When you go to open a bank account for a business, you need your tax IDs. Well, then the banks would send the customers out the door and say, come back when you have your documents, instead the bank says, go use MyCorporation. They’ll get this for you. And you’ll come back. And then the banks maintain that connection, because they said, you can give me your email. I’m going to connect you to MyCorporation, that we would send it to the bank, we would send us the customer and for everybody it would be a win.

 

And so we tried to parlay that idea towards lots of different partnerships, where we were basically helping them onboard their own customers by providing a service.Hope that wasn’t too long winded.

 

Justin:

No, that’s great. So we’re talking a lot these days about how to navigate in times of crisis like this and how you get great insight into existing customers and how they’re struggling and what you mentioned those are a lot of pain points that every small business goes through. What was it like to actually navigate MyCorporation through the financial recession and then obviously as things started to pick back up again and so on, and how did you maintain that purview and that insight into the customer base?

 

Deborah:

Two things, I try really hard to try a lot of things and not dwell on what doesn’t succeed. I almost am like, I don’t notice if it’s not succeeding and if it is then we double down. And so, I think that’s one character or personality, I always say the best thing about me is also the worst. It’s probably my worst character trait, all because I have a hard time admitting defeat. But I’m also able to recognize … Okay, these are the things we really focused on and these worked. And so navigating that transition was, I just kept on moving beyond the things that weren’t working, try this, not working this worked and double down and do more on that.

 

So I think that was one of the biggest features. I think leadership was another big one. The fact that I offered my whole team at Intuit a job and 100% took it, made me feel good as a leader, but I think also shows that we’re a team, we’re in this together. We’re all diving in and going forward with this new business model. And frankly it didn’t end up over the long term. There were some people who left after a year, there were … I think there were 60 of us that left into it and came to start our own company. But 58 of those people stayed. And it’s not for some people, going to a small business. Some loved the structure of corporate.

 

But the neat part to me was the comradery that we had and the team mindset, and they always tease me that I’m their boss. Right. And they know that drives me bonkers, because I always am like, we’re a team. And I couldn’t do without them and vice versa. So I think the other piece of the puzzle is I literally do not sit in my office. I sit on the floor with the team. And so I feel like I hope I gave to them … Look, I have two infants, I’m a mom and all these other things, but I’m in this wholeheartedly. And I think that that resonates with your team when you’re trying to create change and build growth out of something. That’s a big, a big difference. 

 

Justin:

Yeah. From a leadership standpoint we find that agility and the ability to follow  all those trends, right? Like this is working all right, let’s get everyone pointed in the same direction around that success any insights or tips for creating that type of alignment, the organization size, I think plays a big role. But still we see small organizations that are just not able to respond in a way that really can mean the difference between success and failure. So any takeaways through that experience or just in general?

 

Deborah:

No, I think sitting  on the floor with a team helped them feel comfortable telling me what they were hearing from customers. So, I often felt like there was maybe this gap, funny enough, one day I walked into the office, it was like this awful moment. And I was running a little bit later and everyone’s  in their activity on the phones and doing whatever. And I felt this like silence come over the office like, Oh, she’s here, we should behave. And it gave me a pain in my stomach. Like, what do they feel nervous around me? Like, do they not feel comfortable with just us being a group? And literally that day I moved myself out, which was disconcerting to everybody.

 

Like, why the heck is she now sitting out the front? But we became friends and colleagues. And so I guess the mindset that we opened up to was communicate what you’re hearing from customers. And it could be the most insane idea, but some of the things we’ve learned from their ideas have been my best initiatives. And so even, especially actually with partners when it’s replicated over and over, you build themes. And so, Oh, we’re hearing this from this customer, from this partner, they’re having this problem. A good example, actually, just two months ago, someone said, “Oh, I’m giving all these calls from one of our payroll partners. They’re having really significant consternation around the fact that they cannot get notarized documents.” 

 

And so we launched an e-notary product. And if I hadn’t been sitting there and they said to me, just coincidentally, “Oh, we’re not getting our stuff filed because we don’t have any notarizations.” I think they would have just held it in their own heads. Like, “Oh, this is a problem. It’s a delay. We’ll wait till things reopened, whatever. And I’m like, “No, that’s an opportunity. Let’s look at it.” And so I think it’s launching into opportunities and them seeing that you’re listening and responding, but also the outcomes of that, like, wow, this resulted in a whole new product and the customers are interested.

 

And then I think also feeding back to them that credit, right? You guys thought of this, this wasn’t me, I executed on it, but I think that team mindset of we’re all in it.

 

Justin:

During this time do you find yourself hearkening back to those lessons and  the fundamentals that you took from the ’08 financial crisis or has that agility and just team camaraderie and connectivity? Is that just inherent?

 

Deborah:

Yeah, I think sadly currently, yes. We’ve had to dig deep in a way that we haven’t before. And frankly, there’s a bit of a variance here when now we’re a part of a corporate structure. So, we take on some of the margin requirements of the corporate structure or the revenue requirements, which we probably wouldn’t have been as focused on if we had been on our own. I mean, certainly margins are always important, but I would’ve had a little more leniency, but I do think that our team has always had this core structure of  who we are.

 

We’re like really silly and goofy and people always tease me for, Oh, you look like you just have fun all the time. And I always say, well, I have to go to work too. I have to give up being … doing my very favorite things. And I said, come here. And frankly made this one of my favorite things. And so I think the way we think about it, is that I always tease people. Is this a JOB for you? Or is this like what you love? Right. But I really mean it like this. Isn’t just about coming clock in and clock out. And I just don’t want it to feel that way. I want to feel like they’re engaged. So it makes me feel energized and that’s to me a win all the way around.

 

Justin:

And so again, a lot of the traits that you’re describing, like we see unanimously across the board when we talk to entrepreneurs and founders and folks on the show. But it’s always interesting for me to understand what critical thought they’ve given to the situations that birth those traits, right. Or the individuals that have been influential in their lives that maybe gave them the motivation and just the ability to overcome, to be positive, to create that team environment where you’re taking ideas from, from all levels. Anyone in your life that stands out in regards to Catalysts or folks that maybe have shaped that behavior?

 

Deborah:

Yeah. I would say truth be told funny enough, it’s probably  two extremes. One is, and this sounds silly because it’s family, but it’s my mom who instilled in me this insane amount of confidence. Like I didn’t notice in life that people were … Could have their own self interest or you would just went around thinking I was really happy for everyone else, and everyone’s the best in everything. And for a long time, I really thought that … Not that I don’t believe it, but there are variables where there’s other people interested in themselves. And so I think I really did learn this naive approach to how you treat others and how that comes back to you.

 

And that served me, like I mentioned, I think when I got … I was never said like, Oh, because you’re a good person or you’re kind, we gave you this business. There’s something to be said about the belief in me as a human, and as I would … the thought that I would treat my employees well, and I think it’s served me well even as it relates to the employees and ironically, seeing things through my children’s lives to the other extreme of that, and having them frankly feel proud of who I am and what I do. We live in a community where not a lot of moms work, and I take pride in the fact that I went to law school and became a lawyer and have done this and I hope my kids would still say, I think they do, that I’m a great mom.

 

And so it matters to me that I give it my all in whatever I do. And so I think their inspiration or pridefulness that they take and me running a business and bringing them here to see how we’ve grown and what we’ve done is two ends of the bookends, I guess. 

 

Justin:

Yeah, that’s great. So I know recently and you’ll fill me in on the timeline here and so on, but you’ve also  transitioned your role within MyCorporation. And so, tell me a little bit about that shift, what brought it on and what changes have you seen as a result.

 

Deborah:

So about a year and a … I guess it’s a year and a couple months ago, I had a few offers to buy my company. And funny enough, everyone always talks to me historically about exit strategy. Like where did I think it was going? And in my mind, I didn’t have one. And that sounds so silly, because I was enjoying every day. And so I actually created its own funny spiral of offers because I wasn’t anxious to sell. And I think they thought, “Well, what’s in this that she loves it.” It was more that I literally sounds so goofy, but I would get butterflies in my stomach just trying to work like that, this idea that, and I’m excited to see the people and we’re buying, we’re bringing in coffee today, or it’s as something special day and we’re doing something and I literally enjoyed it.

 

So, when I would constantly get interest from VCs and investment bankers, we could sell it, we could do this, and I always had this good excuse like, no, I bought this company out of Intuit by myself. One day when I sell it, I’m going to do it by myself. And then what’s crazy is I got two offers from two strategic buyers at the same time. And I’m like, “Oh my gosh, this is probably meant to be, I should probably sell.” And so over the course of three months, there was a lot of negotiation and I’m probably not the best negotiator, but I think I got a really good deal because coincidentally one offered one, then the next came more and I was very honest, like, this is what’s going on. 

 

And so the transition became like, “Okay, I got to do this.” And the leadership at Deluxe in the small business group was fantastic. They had done other acquisitions of other small businesses, funny enough, which I now run the logo division and the vertical response, which does email marketing. So I felt like they knew what they’re doing. They know how to assimilate small business organizations, and I thought strategically it would be a great opportunity financially it was, but it was also I thought a great learning experience for me because learning from people who’ve done many acquisitions, who have other business experience besides mine, and I think someone once told me, heavy is the head who wears the crown or whatever, and it’s probably true. I think I was ready for people who made me stronger and taught me new things besides my wonderful team, how do I learn and grow? And so I thought that was a neat any timing around that.

 

Justin:

And so how has that transition been for you? It sounds like you’re very invested within that organization and that can be a difficult milestone. So, any keys to navigating those waters?

 

Deborah:

Very few people who have sold their businesses are still around in the corporate, at least in Deluxe and the same held true at Intuit. So both companies did lots of acquisitions and it was very common. So, I think they thought I would be around for a year or two and go, and the interesting … I don’t think it’s a secret, but I don’t have a contract to stay, I’m choosing to stay and thankfully they’re choosing me. And I think that it’s for better, for worse I have a unique energy around entrepreneurship and small business, but I think the corporate structure is hungry for and the fact that I’m trying hard not to give up that and stick with who we are and the corporate team is embracing that. 

 

So, over this whole last year Deluxe is working on restructuring, and there’s a lot going on as everyone knows in the world with COVID, et cetera. And I’ve been so fortunate to be on the leadership team to help make these decisions and choose outcomes. So even though I’m just running these three divisions, I have this access and influence I think in a way that’s helping me learn and hopefully I am guessing they feel the same that I’m offering this entrepreneurial spirit and mindset towards something that is a 100 plus year old company.

 

Justin:

Yeah. It’s definitely a rarity for a large acquiring organization like that to be what seems like adopt a good portion of the DNA of the acquired organization. So that’s definitely unique and a feather in your cap, certainly.

 

Deborah:

It feels special in a way to be embraced in this way where I feel like they were questioning me, I was questioning like, “Can we stand, can we make this work together?” And I think they thought they didn’t want to invest a lot of time and energy if I didn’t anticipate staying, and there was a little bit of, I hold my team close and so, if I were to sell and do it a lot of owners do and make all this money and then just go, I felt  bad. And then on the other hand, like I mentioned, Jillian was called but, I have teenagers who are going to be off to college very soon. And okay, I cannot not do something. I would lose my mind. So I figured, “This is a great time for me to learn and grow in this corporate environment.” 

 

And maybe one day sit on boards and do other things that are maybe less directly time-consuming on a day-to-day but I find that I still feel young and I’m in my early 40s. I’m like, “I can’t retire.” I would lose my mind. And so anyway, the chance to learn and grow is frustrating though, all the meetings are a colossal waste of time in many ways. Actually funny enough, after we spun out of Intuit, I had a one year policy of no scheduled meetings, impromptu meetings, stand up and get on the microphone, have a thought meetings, but never put it on my calendar without me giving you permission.

 

And now I’ve gone back to it. I’m like, “Oh, my God.” And there’s east coast and so anyway.

 

Justin:

How did that go over with the brass, I guess?

 

Deborah:

Yeah. My team loved the no meetings, but the Corp is like, “This is it. This is what you’re doing.” So now I’ve learned a little bit of a dance like you block your calendar. But I find it interesting anyway, and some of the meetings I’m on are the great leadership meetings where you’re learning, but I do feel like it’s a lot of meetings and just like to talk.

 

Justin:

At this point, I love to  transition into some rapid insight questions, a little bit of some curve ball aspects. So, you’re ready?

 

Deborah:

Okay.

 

Justin:

What’s the one thing that you’re most excited for, for the rest of this year, and that is interesting context certainly as we’re navigating COVID and a lot of social unrest and so on, but I’m curious, what are you excited about?

 

Deborah:

I’m mostly excited about the opportunity to have the authority to oversee a number of different divisions and to integrate them in a way that makes us more successful than we are independently. And so, because the other divisions I run have some cohesive products and services like logo design and email and marketing, for me to be able to prove out a model for cross sell and opportunities there as it relates to business. 

 

Personally, I think I’m excited about the opportunity to continue to engage with leadership as an organization, as we grow where we’re headed and change the overall structure and respond to small businesses during that pretty tough time.

 

Justin:

Awesome. What’s the one thing that you’re great at, but hate doing?

 

Deborah:

I’m good at building rapport with the team, but I have a rough time with all of the leadership things where they’re constantly complaining, or I don’t know what the right word is like, I’ve got this problem with that, that problem or the time, the constant ness of people. So when you are open and welcoming, it also yields a tough ongoing as if I have this dialogue with every single employee all day long, day or night, weekend or otherwise. And so that’s the part that’s rough on me. And I hate to say that, but it’s a lot.

 

Justin:

Yeah. But feedback is awesome, but it also sucks. I will absolutely agree with you there, you get what you ask for. What’s one thing that you hate spending money on?

 

Deborah:

Gas. I don’t drive a lot. I work close to home, my kids’ school is close to home so probably just … I don’t know, gas.

 

Justin: I’m trying to assume you guys all work from home right now. Correct? 

 

Deborah:

We are in the office because of service of process for legal documents, because they originally said, “Just have them serve your home.” Can you imagine, not happening? 

 

Justin:

No thank you.

 

Deborah:

There’s just a really tight group here that’s just a few of us are here, so we’re keeping it small, but yeah, we’re here.

 

Justin:

And finally, what  stories do you hope people will tell about you when you’re gone?

 

Deborah:

I really hope people will say I have really good energy and a positive attitude on life. I feel like I work really hard at being deliberate about the way I talk to others and the way I treat people and it would mean a lot to me if people think that that’s who I am at my core, because it’s not a show, it’s who I really believe, and I do think what you put out comes back multiplied. So I think that that would be my goal.

 

Justin:

I don’t think that legacy is in jeopardy. So Deborah, thanks so much for joining us here today. If folks want to connect with you directly, where should they go?

 

Deborah:

My email address is Dsweeney@mycorporation.com. I always respond to emails, and I’m thrilled if you have feedback or thoughts for sure or questions about starting a business.

 

Justin:

Awesome. Well, again, thank you so much for your time here today. It’s great to get not only your insight into what you’ve been through now multiple times in terms of some pretty major events, but also just making those, that certainly a large organization and what can be oftentimes a horror story seem like the excitement and the nimbleness of a startup. So I think you’ve done a great job there. Thank you so much for sharing it with us.

 

Deborah:

Thanks for having me. 

 

Justin:

Absolutely. And so of course you can also connect with Deborah on Twitter. She’s @deborahsweeney and MyCorporation is just that mycorporation.com. Thanks again everyone for joining us here on Catalyst. 

 

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