Episode 6

Megan Heuer | Principal at HeuerB2B

Making Pivots in B2B During COVID-19: Interview with Megan Heuer

August 20, 2020 | Andrea Lechner-Becker | No Comments | ,

Megan Heuer is a growth leader with more than 20 years experience in the B2B industry. As Principal of HeuerB2B, Megan creates measurable impact through emotionally intelligent leadership and is passionate about delivering growth through exceptional customer experiences. 

In this Catalyst interview, Megan shares why retention is a growth strategy, what customer relationship management looks like during COVID-19 and how the best marketers are always willing to lend a hand.

Subscribe to the Podcast to receive alerts as new episodes post.

3 Key Points:

  1. Sometimes you have to navigate change in a pragmatic way, but it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t pause and think differently about your options. In times like these, change can feel overwhelming, but change is also an opportunity. Take pause and let yourself think differently about the ways you can move through the moment, whether it’s a project gone sideways at work or a major career pivot.
  2. Sales and marketing can’t read minds but they can always lead with value. Every organization has different needs and priorities right now, so sales and marketing need to invest time with their prospects and figure out ways to genuinely help them. That means taking the time to really learn and understand what they need and do.
  3. Choose the right customers. Help them choose you. Then help them become successful. When your customers win, you win. It’s really that easy.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

00:49 – How do you pause and manage transitions in the time of COVID-19?

4:09 – What can you learn from being at a crossroads?

7:40 – What’s your best strategy for reaching out to your network and people you may not know?

8:45 – What can people expect from the B2B buying space?

13:20 – What’s your hack for leading with value?

15:50 – Tell us how you’re helping others during this challenging time.

20:24 – What are you seeing out in the market that has you really inspired?

23:23 – Do you see B2B marketers overcomplicating simple concepts?

24:30 – Is there a dashboard marketers should be using to facilitate the right conversations in board rooms?

27:20 – How do you measure brand?

31:48 – Wrap-Up: Find Megan on LinkedIn

Looking for more episodes? Check out more of our best practice podcasts!

Full Transcript

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

Hi everyone. Welcome to the Catalyst Podcast by LeadMD. I am your host today, Andrea Lechner-Becker. I am here today with Megan Hauer.

 

Megan, tell us a little bit about what you have going on, because I know that your life has transitioned quite a bit lately, and you’re up to really cool stuff, and you can probably explain it way better than I can in my staunch little bio read.

 

Megan Heuer:

Well, thank you. I appreciate you asking, and you know what? It’s actually been kind of cool and interesting, and I would love to share that because I think there are a lot of people going through all kinds of transitions right now, in every aspect of their lives, personal, professional, you name it. It’s kind of a neat time to pause and say, “Oh my gosh, what just happened?” So, here’s what just happened.

 

Megan Heuer:

I spent about, oh my gosh, almost 12 years at a company called Sirius Decisions, which is a wonderful B2B research and advisory firm. I had a great time helping to build that company, from when I joined, it was 12 people, and when I left and it got acquired by Forester, it was like 350. A really fun ride to be on for a long time. I was super lucky to get to lead the research organization, so all the analysts, all the wonderful editorial people, for a number of years before I left. The really interesting thing about doing a job like that for a long time is you grow so much, you learn so much, the company’s growing, your role is growing. You’re learning all these different things, every single day. You’ve got wonderful clients to work with.

 

Megan Heuer:

But there came a day for me, after I spent a year with a great team at Forrester and being part of that integration, where I said, “Oh my gosh, I need to get my hands dirty again. I need to go back to being a marketer, to working with customers, to just doing this stuff and going back to that.” I had a fantastic opportunity to do that with Engagio in the ABM space, that I know and love. I founded the ABM practice at Sirius back longer than I care to admit, like eight years ago or something crazy, before it was a thing. Unfortunately, the Engagio opportunity didn’t last as long as I would have liked, and I found myself at a little bit of a crossroads.

 

Megan Heuer:

That was in April, and fast forward to now, and I can say it’s been one of the best experiences of my life, the last like two months. Even with all of the craziness in the world, all of the challenges in the world, it’s very rare to have an opportunity to pause and say, “What do I want to be when I grow up?”, when you’re actually a grown up, or at least you try to be most of the time. So I’ve been doing that.

 

Megan Heuer:

One of the things that I’m really thinking about is, how do you make a transition in a pragmatic way? We all got to earn a living, but also, in a way that lets you honor that moment in your life where you get to really think differently, and bigger, and have some fun, and connect with the network that you’ve built over a year. That is what I have been doing. I started Heuer B2B, which is an independent, that would be me, by independent, that would be me, Consulting Organization, doing fractional CMO work and other kinds of strategic projects. At the same time, my commitment has been to, at least once a day, every single day, talk to somebody doing something cool. I can’t tell you all the great learning that’s come from that.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

I think you can tell us, and I’m on the edge of my seat. What have you been learning?

 

Megan Heuer:

All right. So, here’s what I’ve been learning. First of all, people are incredibly kind and generous. They just are. They’re wonderful. You reach out and you say, “Hey, guess what happened to me?” And they’re like, “Oh my gosh, what can I do to help?” Instantly, even if they don’t know you, even if they’re just like, “Hey, I heard this, I don’t know you, but can I help you?” It’s amazing. I truly believe in the kindness of humanity. I do. We all have to be part of that. Then beyond that, just like asking people how they started their business. I’ve talked to independent consultants, I’ve talked to people with small businesses, I’ve talked to people who do work for very large companies. I’ve talked to folks like your recent guests, Sangram, from Terminus, talking to him about how’d you get a book done. How do you do that? That’s super cool. How did you do that?

 

Megan Heuer:

Everybody has a really, really meaningful piece of advice to share about the road that you’re going to be on. I think one of the best pieces of advice that I got from anybody was a gentleman who has an independent consulting consortium I’ll call it, of people around where I live, in Connecticut and Westchester County, in the financial services space. He said, “The first thing you want to do is draw a picture, three circles. One is what you’re good at, what you love to do, and then the third one is what people will pay you for. And that intersection, that little Venn diagram you’ve got going there, will tell you the place that you can probably build something really meaningful in the market.” I’ve been sharing that with a number of different people, kind of in transition, and we’re all like, “Yeah, that’s really fun.” And sadly, right now, nobody actually wants to pay me for baking cookies or writing a mystery novel, so I’m going to stick with the whole B2B kind of revenue space, for the time being, but one day, one day, a girl can hope.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

I love that. What else did you learn about publishing a book?

 

Megan Heuer:

I thought this was really great advice from Sangram, and that is, decide why you want to write a book. What’s the point? He said, “Is it just going to be the very best direct mail piece ever, for building your business? Is it because…” Because a book it’s like, look, I wrote a book here or trust me, give me money. Then there’s also the, it’s just I’ve always wanted to try to book. I think there are a lot of us out there who just have always felt like, you know what, I love writing, I’ve always wanted to do this. It’s a thing. It’s almost like a personal prestige/mission kind of thing that you might have. The other one is to make some money with it. It’s to say, I’m actually going to sell this book. I want to go to a publisher and see if they will pay me to do this, and then hopefully have people buy it.

 

Megan Heuer:

It can be a combination of those things, but the first thing you really need to do is say, “What’s the point? What’s my goal?” Then once you know your goal, you can start to establish the kind of thing you should be doing and you should be writing, and who then, in terms of, should it be self published or traditional or whatever you might want to do, just something online? Then you go and decide how you’re going to do it, and who you need to work with to make that happen. He actually told me he was able to write a book in three months, and that’s amazing to me. That’s a high bar. I don’t know how he did that, but it was pretty cool, but it was really interesting I think, his thought process was a really good one.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

What’s your mechanism for reaching out to all these folks?

 

Megan Heuer:

Honestly, LinkedIn, and the people who are unfortunate enough to still be in my contacts in my phone, texting like a fiend. LinkedIn is really and truly, like I will say, my last five jobs have come from connections on LinkedIn, and really just keeping that network going, sharing, being part of it. I love, love, love, you see some people out there every single day, putting meaningful work out, putting themselves out there. Sometimes it’s personal, sometimes it’s business, but really using that as, I think, kind of a voice, and a connection opportunity when so many of us really miss that. I think it’s turned out to be that, and that’s just, yeah, that’s working. LinkedIn and Zoom, man, I guess that’s the tool kit these days.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

That sounds good, and you kind of mentioned that you’re obviously learning a bunch, and you’re doing some client work. What are you seeing out in the B2B buying space? Are people still buying, from your experience? And if so, what do they care about? What do you see?

 

Megan Heuer:

Yeah, so interesting. I’ve had the opportunity to see some great data. I think the thing that we’re seeing is that there was a downturn in March, when everybody found out they had to go home and was sorting themselves out. But it turned around pretty quickly in terms of buyer activity out there, people are in market, not everyone is in market. So the trick is knowing who is, and going back and making sure that you’ve re-evaluated your target market, in light of the macroeconomic situation around their industry, or the sub industries. And then further refining from there, to say, “Okay, and who’s still looking?” Because every company is different, even if they’re in an industry that theoretically should be doing just fine, maybe they’re not. Maybe they’re just, or they’ve just decided to be really, really conservative and not invest.

 

Megan Heuer:

You want to not waste your sales folks time in the wrong places, of course. You know that better than anybody, Andrea. You want to make sure you’re in the right places, but people are out there looking, the trick is to find the ones who are looking, and then say something useful for God’s sake. Like, honestly, there’s so much nonsense out there. Nobody has patience for it. I think that’s the key, really, that’s the other thing that I’m seeing is, while people are open to talking to you, and I’ve even seen data from some companies that track responsiveness to outbound calling, to various kinds of mechanisms, as well as intent data, people will respond, if you have something useful to say. I think that’s the bar that we as marketers really have to hit now, is use all that great information. Knowledge is power, always has been, and shame on you if you’re losing the opportunity to take advantage of it.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

At LeadMD, we did some buyer research and found that about 50% of people are still buying, and 50% aren’t. Of the 50 that are still buying, about two thirds of them are looking for new solutions because of COVID, and then the other are just researching things that they already had on their mind. So, I totally agree, it’s about finding that 50% of people who are still doing that. Out of curiosity, what’s your hack to figure that out?

 

Megan Heuer:

I’m just seeing people make really smart use of, frankly, intent data, and their own information. But then, I saw a great post today, and I wish I could give the person who posted it credit for it, and I wish I remembered his name, because I was like, “That is just so smart.” It was a great post that basically said, for that 50% who say they aren’t looking anymore, now, assuming it’s not like some horrible dire situation, if it is just, “Hey, we’re being conservative, my budget’s been pushed out a few months. What’s your natural instinct?” It’s to say, “Oh, okay, I’ll call you in August”, or I’ll call you in October or whatever. And what I thought was brilliant in this post was the person said, “What’s going to be different in October?”

 

Megan Heuer:

And then the person would come back and say, “Oh well, we’re researching now, so that when my budget opens up in October, we can start to make a decision.” And this person’s response was, “Remember when you were a kid and you wanted something really cool, and your parents told you you had to save your allowance? Well, I’m guessing you’re saving up your allowance, and while you’re saving up your allowance, don’t you want to know every single last thing there is to know about”, in this guy’s case, a Batman bike, which I thought was pretty funny. But he said, “I knew everything about it, so that when I finally got my allowance saved up, I was ready and I could just go, and hit the accelerator.”

 

Megan Heuer:

I thought that that was a really smart way to say, how can you have a meaningful and productive way to stay in touch with the people who aren’t ready to say yes, because they literally just can’t get the funds, and help keep them in the loop, keep them educated and help frame the way they’re thinking about solving their problem, as a help, right now. And then, when they’re ready, so much the better. I think that’s, so it’s sort of the hack of, we’ll get all the great data that’s out there, but then the other hack is, and if you’re not getting the answers you want, what’s a way to reframe that conversation so it’s productive and meaningful for both of you.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

Yeah, and that you have something to offer them in return, right? Because I think that’s the big thing that we’re talking to a lot of clients about is that, there is no way to predict explicitly what every single organization is thinking. But, what you can do is make sure that you’re leading with value. A lot of what you just mentioned there, I think, is a missing piece to a lot of sales, a lot of SaaS sales cycles specifically, which is the ability to equip some gatekeeper, influencer, with the information to go convince their boss that, to your point, when you have your money all saved up, it’s time to go, and this is the right solution.

 

Megan Heuer:

Yeah. Well, and I’ll tell you my other favorite hack, for where that information comes from, what you would give to your customers. If you’re going to help your customers be successful with your solution, you are helping them understand the problem that they’re solving for. You understand their need or their opportunity, maybe it’s not a problem, maybe it’s upside. You understand what they’re trying to do. You’re, hopefully, providing them with the resources and tools and information and connections and services and whatever else you need wrapped around to help them be successful. Your customer success team is, every day, engaging with them. Your account managers, every day, engaging with them. Your service people, your product, people, everyday learning, learning, learning about what your customers need and do.

 

Megan Heuer:

The content that comes from that is so valuable, and that is the kind of thing that you can be adjusting, and sometimes you don’t even need to, sometimes it’s the same thing that you create. You can give that to your prospects, to help them stay on that cycle, stay on that thinking, and genuinely be helping them. If you haven’t done it yet, it’s no better time, then to focus on making sure that the customers you have give you value.

 

Megan Heuer:

I’m always a broken record on retention is a growth strategy. It is. If you keep who you have, when business gets better, your upside happens that much faster, you’re not filling a leaky bucket. You do that by bringing value to your customers, helping them get value, helping them get the most out of your solution and their opportunity. That content, then, can turn into this virtuous cycle with your buyers. Not to mention, you’ve got some really happy customers who are out there saying wonderful things about you after you do that. It’s not an easy hack. I suppose the definition of hack is to make it simple, but it’s the most worthwhile one, truly.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

I love that advice. So we’ve talked about people who’ve been helping you during this transition. How are you helping others?

 

Megan Heuer:

My husband would probably complain that I have done exactly zero gardening, that I promised to do at home. However, I did get rid of some dandelions in the backyard, because that’s the one weed I know we don’t want. But other than that, I’m excited, I’m going to be hosting a mentoring group with women in revenue, on folks in career transition, seeing as that’s very fresh on my mind, and I got some great advice from a number of folks. I’m happy to sort of pass that along, and also just learn, from that group. I’m really excited to do that.

 

Megan Heuer:

I’m just doing my best, every single day, when I see opportunities in my network for new things out there, and there’s a lot of opportunities. That’s the other thing, is it’s not just people are still buying, they’re still hiring. They’re still growing their teams. They’re still upscaling their teams. I’m passing those along to my network to make sure that the right people find the great opportunities that are out there and just making those connections.

 

Megan Heuer:

I think just overall, probably like a lot of us, just trying to be kind, trying to listen, trying to be a friend, trying to be a good family member. That right now kind of seems like the biggest gift of all, of the crazy times that we’re in, and having that opportunity and just doing what I can to help people in whatever part of their journey I can, business or personal. That’s what I’m doing. How about you? What are you doing, Andrea? I’m curious to know.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

Well, I have, historically, always reached out to at least one person in my network every week. I don’t do every day, that’s intense.

 

Megan Heuer:

It helps when you don’t have a full time job.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

Yeah. So, I do that. Then, I actually feel like my giving of myself has gotten pretty selfish lately. Certainly, I have been absolutely consumed by the complete change in my strategy. I am a planner. I like structure and I like having my plan. Then, when all of your major events get canceled and you have to move everything, I think it’s super exciting. You have the opportunity to do things that you would’ve never had a budget for, you get to experiment with things, you get to really almost be like a real marketer, in some ways. Just get really creative around tactics you probably wouldn’t have had time or capacity to think about while you’re planning all these events. I’ve been really focused on that.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

Then, I mean, at LeadMD, we do the same sort of thing, we try to connect clients and prospects and people in the market with great marketers. Then I do mentoring with the Fearless 50, I have two mentees there. I still do stuff like that, but you’re making me jealous. I really should, I should put more effort into it, Megan, to be honest.

 

Megan Heuer:

I’m still not going to get into gardening.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

Yeah. That’s another interesting thing. My husband started a business in December, and decided to go full time into it in February. We’ve been puddling along on that too. What is this, not puddling? It’s like…

 

Megan Heuer:

Doggy paddle?

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

Yeah. We’ve been doggy paddling along in that business too, so I’m sort of helping him figure out, and that’s like super interesting because he’s a sales guy, by heart. So, the sales guy starts his company and then I’m helping him with all of his marketing and these sorts of things, frankly, like the techniques for how you may not have a client today, but what can you give them so that they remember you come time to buy again?

 

Megan Heuer:

That’s cool. It’s so interesting, a lot of the companies that I’m talking to, even the really small ones, they’re doing just fine. There’s opportunity out there. I think it’s a great time to start something. It seems super counterintuitive, but you never know, sometimes really, really great things can come out of disruptions in markets.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

That actually is something we were talking about before we started, the idea of just what an opportunity this is. What are you seeing out in the market that has really inspired you?

 

Megan Heuer:

Well, first of all, I love it whenever businesses have to pause and say, “I really need to focus on my customer.” It’s been great. I’ve been teaming up with a friend of mine, on a podcast about CRM, but the actual old original meaning, Customer Relationship Management. And what is that today? What does that mean? It’s been kind of turned into software, but it’s really not. It’s really going back and having this sort of fundamental understanding of who you either have sold to, or want to sell to, and who they are, and what they need. And how you can help them, and how you can understand differences in value through your customer base. And who’s got the opportunity to grow with you, and in what ways, and all of those engagement methods, I think, a moment in the market where companies have to really think about that, their hand gets forced, is actually really good because, hopefully, they’ll continue that work once things get a bit more back to normal.

 

Megan Heuer:

And it’d be very easy to go back to, “Oh, it’s all about finding new prospects.” Well, you know what, probably the gift that keeps on giving is going to be going back to that customer. So getting in that habit, and also, helping marketers acquire those kinds of skills and mindsets around what’s different when I’m trying to help an existing customer, or engage in support and renew an existing customer, versus when I’m trying to win a new one. A lot’s the same, but a lot isn’t, so it’s a neat learning opportunity, I think, for teams to just shift gears a little.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

Yeah. I totally agree, and we’re seeing that a lot with our clients too. A lot of people who’ve kind of, “Oh yeah, that’s a division of the business that we have to start.” Or like, a whole new go-to-market, a whole new buyer, a whole new use case, a whole new thing, and this has made it a priority when it normally wouldn’t have been for many years.

 

Megan Heuer:

Yeah. Agreed. And it’s such a good one. It’s been something I’ve been passionate about for 20 years. Help your customers, make your customers successful, choose the right customers, and help the right customers choose you, you win. That’s it. It’s that easy.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

Yeah. What is it about B2B marketers, do you think, that makes them over-complicate what is really a simple concept?

 

Megan Heuer:

How they’re rewarded. If your incentive structure is all leads all the time, all revenue, new revenue, all the time, you’re going to focus on that. You said your husband’s a sales guy, he knows that. If your reward structure is around how much business you close, guess what you’re going to focus on? And that is how mostly we reward marketers in B2B. There’s not anywhere near enough room for understanding, I think, the more nuanced role of marketing. To your point about being able to be a real marketer now, you can think about brand, you can think about perception, and different strategies for how to use marketing’s tool kit in ways that don’t just get people in the top of the funnel.

 

Megan Heuer:

I’m oversimplifying now. I’m just saying, okay, everybody’s rewarded for that, but I mean, money is the dashboard I’ve seen where those are the dominant metrics that marketing is judged by, for years. We’ve created our own monster, because we wanted to get a seat at the board table, we wanted to be able to prove we brought value, and that’s all good, but we get to renegotiate those terms now. It’s really important. Customer engagement, customer renewals, customer lifetime value, the real kind, where you say, how do we grow the full share of wallet we can get from this customer because we brought them so much value, how do we turn them into raving fans and all of those different forms? That all has to be considered a real business contribution, and right now, if it’s not a lead of revenue, not so much. So, we got some work to do there.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

You answered my question. I was going to ask, what is the, well, maybe not. Let me just ask the question. What is the dashboard that marketers should be using to go into the door to the boardroom and facilitate the right kind of conversation?

 

Megan Heuer:

Yeah. It’s, first of all, if you kind of think about what marketing can be. It’s brand experience, and its customer experience, and then revenue outcome. And part of that, I would even say, is employee experience. There’s a great model that Sirius Decisions did, at one point, that was a brand customer employee, and when you have all of those things coming together, magic happens. They all feed each other, empowered and excited and enthusiastic employees then create better customer experiences, that then feed into a brand that becomes trusted and loved, and financed, by the way too. All of those good things happen out of that kind of triangle. So having a dashboard then for marketing that allows you to reflect that fuller charter of what you’re trying to do, is really important. But I think the beginning negotiation point has to start with knowing who it is you want to reach.

 

Megan Heuer:

I think having a really well-defined target account list, whether it’s 20 or 20,000, define it, know who you want to engage. Then, begin to pay attention to how well you are, or are not, engaging the people in them that you care about. Everything sort of flows out of that. Many people on that target account list are existing customers, so you can put a lens on that, that says, “Am I engaging them via marketing? Am I engaging them via product?” You can add that. There’s all these great different ways to take a look at that, that’s the product led growth model, it’s sort of customer led growth, really. You can start to look at, if there’s growth opportunity in existing customers, am I getting into the right doors? Am I cross selling? Am I upselling? Am I doing the things that point towards renewal and all the things marketing can do to help there?

 

Megan Heuer:

Then on the flip side of that, if it’s an account you’re not in, what are you doing to get there? And how are you teaming up with your sellers or with others in the organization who can get into those accounts, to help make sure that you’re doing that. So I think just that starting point of who, and then what you need to do to get in there, those are important things to track. And then, you start to be able to get this complete picture of marketing’s contribution. It’s complicated, unfortunately. I wish it were easier. It’s not as easy as saying, it’s a volume of leads at the top of the funnel, and how much revenue converts by the end. The story of B2B buying is more complicated than that these days, especially as we’re going to be all remote selling and digital engagement, and all those good things. But the good news about all those things is they’re super trackable too, so I think we’re going to be able to get a lot of credible measures of all of those things.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

Yeah. How do you measure brand?

 

Megan Heuer:

Yeah, that one, I think comes a lot from customer experience metrics. Now, that’s my bias. I think people would argue, you can do your big traditional brand studies, and you can kind of get out there and find out about brand perception and brand awareness. You can do some of that by reaching into the audience you’re trying to get to, back to that defined universe, who do I care about, and how many of them are actually engaging with me. But going back to tracking some customer experience metrics of, what are the behaviors I need to see in my base, even if you go back to good old net promoter score, or whatever other loyalty metric you like.

 

Megan Heuer:

Also, you can look at customer support, and customer service. You can look at your own renewal rates. If you don’t have good gross and net renewal, you have a problem. So all of those, I think, become ways to reflect back whether your brand is delivering on its promise. It’s a little bit of thinking, I think, not a lot of people are doing right now because you still think of brand as this separate thing, but your rate of advocacy, your positive customer reviews, all of those things that come from your customer experience, feed into what your brand is.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

I’m going to switch gears here a little bit, back to catalyst concepts. At the beginning of this, you mentioned that this was such a great opportunity, and you’ve seen a lot of growth and excitement in the past couple of months. Do you have any words of wisdom for people that are feeling down? Maybe they got furloughed and have been trying to do things on their own, and things just aren’t working. What would you tell them? What words of wisdom do you have?

 

Megan Heuer:

Yeah. So I’ll give credit to John Russo from B2B Fusion, who’s been a long time, kind of a part of my network. I live in Connecticut, he’s here in the Greater New York area. And when my transition happened, he was one of the first people to really kind of reach out and say, “Hey, I’ve been there. This is hard. And you just need to pause and just let yourself feel that.” Andrea, I’m guessing you’re like me, you want to get out there, you want to do, you want to move, you want to go, you want to plan.

 

Megan Heuer:

This one? I had to go contrary to my own personality of just wanting to move forward. And John said, “Give yourself permission to be concerned and upset and scared and nervous and whatever you need to be. Just give yourself permission to be that. If today you’re excited and want to go do something, great. If tomorrow you don’t, fine. Go sit on the deck. It doesn’t matter. Give yourself permission, and then when you feel like you’re ready, you can come out of that, and build what you want to build. Just know that you’re going to need that, and to be kind to yourself as you’re going through that.”

 

Megan Heuer:

I have to say, that was so important. I think the other thing was reaching out to people that weren’t necessarily people I thought were going to give me a job or talk to me about work or anything, just people that I like, who are super positive, and just have a great outlook on life, and interesting things to say and a kind word when you need it. Whether that’s a friend from a million years ago, or somebody you just happened to run into in the neighborhood, or a colleague that has gone a different direction, but that you just really appreciate. They could probably use a kind word too, we all can.

 

Megan Heuer:

I found that a lot of those conversations, just with those great, interesting, valuable people out there made my day more than I can say. The support and the ideas and the different thinking that I got was so inspiring and energizing. Most of us have networks that we spent our careers, our lives, creating, of people that we care about. It’s rare that you can really pause and tap into that. I would say, if you are going through that, and you are feeling down, reach out to people that you know are going to have some positive energy to give you back. Then you’ll have the positive energy to give back to them and others.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

I love that. I think that’s a perfect place to end. That’s my favorite tip, is just when you’re feeling isolated, un-isolate yourself and reach out. I think that’s really fantastic.

 

Andrea Lechner-Becker:

Thanks so much for listening to this episode of the Catalyst podcast. You can find us on iTunes. You can subscribe there or you can find us at leadmd.com/bestpractices. And you can check out all of the videos that we have here. There’s a category called video and you’ll find us. There’s also a category called podcasts. You’ll find us there too. Just come on over, subscribe to our content. We have good stuff. We try to entertain and educate around marketing, sales, business entrepreneurship. Oh my gosh, the things we talk about. Come join us and have fun.

Looking for more episodes? Check out more of our best practice podcasts!

Denise-Title-Card

The Importance of Finding Sponsors in B2B Organizations: Interview with Denise Broady

As the COO/CMO for WorkForce Software, Denise Broady's responsibilities reach far. She oversees the global...
Deborah-Title-Card

How to Align Teams During Times of Transition: Interview with Deborah Sweeney

Deborah Sweeney is the Leader of MyCorporation.com, an online business filing company helping 1 million+...